The Faster Bangus Deboning Method

The bangus is so delectable but eating such is not as enjoyable as expected. There is something that is holding me back, the fishbone. Bangus has lots of fishbones. I have to carefully sort out as much fishbone as I can or I am going to end up having a lodge fishbone on my throat.
I am guessing the two popular boneless bangus products were invented because many people have the same complaints as me. They cut the bangus in the middle and removed all the  bones to make it daing na sariwa. Others removed the fish flesh without damaging the skin. Shred the flesh while removing all individual bones. Mixed it with various ingredients and stuff back to skin to make a relyenong bangus.
I have not personally experienced bangus deboning yet but I watched somebody doing it while I was in college. They shredded the boiled flesh and started sorting out bones one by one using bare hands. The process was so slow that I could not imagine myself doing it.
Lately a friend of mine who is into processing and selling fruits and fish products shared a better and faster way to debone a bangus for relyeno making. That is rubbing the boiled flesh on a fine mesh tray. The shredded fish will fall down leaving most of the fishbones on the tray. Of course the method is not foolproof as some bones are going to pass through. Just keep an eye on it and pick up every miss. This method is easier and faster.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Using The Joy Charcoal Stove For Grilling Bangus

She bought it at World Trade Center exhibit. Why she bought it? Perhaps her officemate bought too so she got carried.

joy charcoal stove

LPG stove is very convenient. Turn the knob and it is ready. Unlike charcoal and wood stove, it need few minutes to eternity to start a good heat. Yeah, might be eternity for first time users. The latter two choices are cheaper especially when the source of fire wood and charcoal is nearby and free – the farm.

Perhaps she want to save on lpg cost since I can get firewood and charcoal for free.

Some observations and tips…

The stove looks like a casserole. It has cover and two ear handles. It also has wire handle. I think it is for easy transport while the unit is hot. However, it looks too weak for the stove weight. I rather let it cool and hold on two ears.

It is patented. Imitation are prohibited.

It has four stove rings (never sure if the right term is “ring”)and one small circle for complete closure. Use only the outermost ring for big casserole. Place the second ring for smaller cooking vessel and so on.

I think it is made of fragile metal, the same metal used for making kaldero. The grilled plate in stove center holds the charcoal. A small handle below it can be moved right and left to close and open the air source. More air means higher ember heat and vice versa. Closing it will cease the heat.

grilled metal plate

charcoal stove air source

The unit can be disassembled for easy cleaning.

To start, remove all the stove rings. Open the air source fully. Get some scratch paper, fire it and place on charcoal holder. Then place charcoal gradually on burning paper. Place rings according to size of casserole. Additional charcoal can be placed by opening the ear handle.

opening the ear handle

It’s time to use it…

I remove all the rings and place a grill. Yep, a grill for roasting purposes is provided.  I gonna grill bangus.

While grilling…

The bangus does not fit perfectly. I am adjusting the position from time to time to heat the head and tail. There is plenty of space on both sides – this make the air bent below useless. I also notice that I can only roast two at the same time and still wasting some space on both sides. A square stove design would fit three. The manufacturer has bigger stoves. Never sure if they have square designs.

grilling bangus

After grilling…

I removed the grill. Place on all the rings and circle. I made sure that air source is completely closed. I want to save the remaining charcoal for next cooking.

I opened the stove after few hours and all the charcoals are completely turned to ashes. I gonna pour some water on it next time.

Up next … cooking rice.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How to Cook Pinaputok Na Tilapia (In Banana Leaves)

Another delectable tilapia recipe!

Ingredients:
1 tomato, chopped, crunchy ripe is preferred
1 thumb size ginger, sliced thinly
1 onion, chopped
1 glove garlic, minced
1 fresh tilapia, the bigger the better

Procedure:
1) Prepare all the ingredients listed above. Removed the gills and other entrails of tilapia. Then wash thoroughly under running water or several changes of still water. Whatever method of washing you want to use is okay.

2) Deepen and widen the cut along tilapia belly by using a sharp pointed knife. Take care not to force the knife to other side. Stuffing will be hard if it happens

3) Fill all the ingredients to tilapia belly then wrapped it with banana leaves. Secure the wrap with abaca tie. A tie made of any banana  bracts will do. We call it lapnis in tagalog.

Other uses aluminum as wrapper. The golden brown color will never be achieved however. Too much stuffing ingredients can still be included in wrap, outside the fish.

4) Fry each side for five minutes on vegetable oil.

5) Serve

pinaputok na tilapia

I wonder why my wife transferred it to fresh banana leaves. Maybe she was after the presentation. I think it would be nicer if she never removed the fried leaves.

The recipe is related to inihaw na tilapia (ember cooked) wrapped in aluminum foil  and inihaw na bangus, broiled milkfish, wrapped in banana leaves. You may jump to this two recipes instead if you are a cooking oil hater. They are not dipped in cooking oil and the smoke flavor make them more delectable.

Anyway, the dish is good. I like it!

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.