The Pledge of Responsible Rice Consumption – Panatang Makapalay

I think this pledge was written to promote rice saving attitude among us.

Bilang isang mamayang Filipino nakiisa ako sa panatang huwag magsayang ng kanin at bigas.

I, a Filipino citizen, is promising not to waste rice and rice grains.

Magsasaing ako ng sapat lamang at sisiguraduhing tamang tama and pagkakaluto nito.

I will cook enough rice for consumption and will ensure that every batch is well done.

Kukuha ako ng kaya ko lang ubusin upang sa aking pinggan ay walang matirang kanin.  Ganun din ang aking gagawin  kung may handaan o kung sa labas ako kakain.

I will get a serving that I can consume so there will be no leftover on my plate. I will practice the same whenever I eat in fiestas, parties, restaurants or whenever I eat outside my home.

Ang brown rice or pinawa ay susubukan kong kainin, pati na ang ibang pagkain bukod sa kanin  tulad ng saba, kamote at mais.

I will try eating brown rice and other energy-giving foods such as saba banana, camote and corn.

Ituturo ko sa iba ang responsableng pagkonsumo nang mabigyang halaga ang pagod ng mga magsasaka at ng makatulong na maging sapat ang bigas sa Pilipinas.

I will preach to others the responsible rice consumption, in order to give importance to farmers’ hard work and help in attaining and maintain adequate rice supply.

Aking isasapuso ang panatang ito dahil sa bawat butil ng bigas o kanin na aking matitipid ay may buhay na masasagip.

I will practice this pledge with all my hearth, because for every rice and rice grain I save, there is a life that can be saved.

The pledge is courtesy of 2013 National Year of the Rice paper board fan, www.nyr2013.com. It was originally written in Tagalog.

panatang makapalay fan 1panatang makapalay fan 2

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Ripe Cavendish and Lakatan Banana Should be Green

We used to grow four banana varieties. The saba, latundan, lakatan and kwarenta dias or 40 days. It was trimmed down to only one now, the saba banana.

Latundan. It is the common round and short bananas commonly sold in public markets. Usually bright yellow with numerous dark red spots. Yellow with noticeable specs of green when rare ripe. Fully yellow and softer when fully ripe.

Kwarenta dias/40 days. They are saying that the number of days from shoot emergence to fruiting and to ripening is 40. The variety gathered its name from it. Not sure if it is true or not. It is not popular due to its relatively small size. A single peeled finger is only as big as adult man thumb.

Saba. We are calling it the lazy farmer’s crop. Why? The only hard part in management is planting. Then several new shoots will grow from its corm. The mother plant will bear fruits once. The several shoots will also grow and bear fruits and the cycle continues. The variety is resistant to competing weeds and pest. It requires minimal supervision. This saba banana is like a pot of gold.

Saba is a plantain or cooking banana. It can be eaten raw and ripe but it is best for making banana chips, ketchup, powder and vegetable dish garnish.

Lakatan. A banana variety similar to latundan. However, it is longer but thinner. The taste qualities are the same but lakatan never go yellow when ripe.

Buyers judge a ripe and delicious banana by its color. The green ripe banana is not appealing.  Growing kwarenta dias was discontinued due to its very small sizes, obviously not profitable. Latundan was discontinued cause it is weak against pest and diseases. Lakatan was discontinued cause it is weak against pest and diseases plus it never go yellow when ripe.

I saw some fellow farmers harvesting extra large bananas. Mom said it was cavendish. They never want to plant it cause it never go yellow when ripe, just like lakatan variety.

Perhaps the yellow lakatan and cavendish for sale were treated with ethylene solution. A plant stress and ripening substance that can also induce breakdown of chlorophyll.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Ripe Saba Banana for Making Banana Chips

I did a banana chip making demo. The director took a sample, ate it and commented,”the banana chips tasted like raw bananas, mapakla pa“. Of course it did, it was made of green bananas. As stated in my previous note, “Using Raw Bananas and Artificial Flavors for Banana Chips“, ripe bananas are not fit for chip making. Artificial banana flavor is used to mask the raw taste.

Well, the following changed my belief.

Mom gave me ripe Saba bananas yesterday. I set aside two pieces for my little crazy thing. The rest went to boiling water the next day, as nilagang saging.

I removed the banana peels. Cut off and ate both ends. Sliced thinly, about 1-2 mm thick.  Then fried the slices in oil over very low flame for ten minutes. This method is from the idea of “How to Make Cassava Fries“, cook the slices before browning occurs.

ripe saba banana slicesThe browning started from center and edges. Getting wider and wider until the ten minutes time frame. It was not crunchy while in oil and immediately after removal. It became crispy after two minutes of cooling.

Crunchy dark brown banana chips with a bitter sweet taste and unpleasing appearance.

ripe banana chips oneripe banana chips two

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Boiled Saba Banana | Boiling La Tundan Banana Too?

These are boiled saba banana. We ate plenty of these during our childhood years. Its  a cheap and affordable merienda. In fact it was always free. Almost 1/3 of father’s farm was covered with bananas.

boiled saba banana

Saba bananas can be boiled when still green, it taste awful though. Can be boiled when yellow ripe, its yummy. Can also be boiled when at its almost overripe stage, this is the most delectable for me.

The picture below is La Tundan banana. Its taste when green is astringent or mapakla. Full yellow ripe is sweet and commonly eaten as dessert.

banana la tundan

I asked mom before why she often cooked saba banana but never cooked la tundan. She said that it cannot be boiled. No further explanations said.

Saba banana is a cooking type. It is starchy. During boiling, the starch undergoes the process of gelatinization. A reason why saba banana is firmer when cooked. La tundan is a dessert type. Fit only for eating when in its yellow ripe stage. It contains less starch – not enough to gelatinize the whole fruit.

Too see is to believe so I set up a simple experiment. I got one ripe la tundan and boiled it for ten minutes.

The first observation. The peel cracked.

a crack boiling latundan banana

Due to its low starch content, the pulp become mushy. It looks disgusting. Would you like to eat something like this?

mushy cooked la tundan banana

I got a fork and tasted a bit. The taste became antringent / mapakla.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Unsweetened Banana Chips From Saba Banana Rejects

The two to three bottom end hands of saba banana are considered rejects. They are rejects because they are smaller than the rest of banana and usually contain less fingers. They are not included in sale cause they tend to make the whole batch price lower.

reject saba banana

The three bottom ends are called “puto”. Puto ng saging is pronounced differently than puto – the Filipino rice cake similar to muffins.  The two “puto” syllables are pronounced very fast with a  quick stop.

Rejects are usually left behind to ripe and eaten, to rot or as feed to animals – horses and cows. This time I got three banana hands. All of them are rejects. The three hands are left behind after my brother sold his harvest.

Lets make unsweetened banana chips from it!

1) Cut both ends and peel with a knife. Insert the knife from one side and remove the peel by twisting the inserted knife gently.  Always use a stainless steel knife, steel knives leave a dark spots on banana.

2) Soak peeled banana in clean water to prevent discoloration and remove latex.

peeling of saba banana

3) Slice thinly and uniformly. Crosswise or lengthwise. Uniformity can be achieved by using a banana slicer, a food processor or a knife with a cutting guide like the one below.

guided knife for slicing banana

4) Also, soak the sliced banana in water to prevent discoloration. Drain it for about five minutes before frying.

5) Put cooking oil in cooking vessel. Set the flame to high and wait until it slightly emits smoke. Drop enough sliced bananas. Stir to prevent sticking together of slices. Then set the flame to low after two minutes.

frying of banana chips

6) Take one chip at regular interval to check. Cooking is done once the banana chips are crispy. Another way to determine is by its color. Cooked banana chips are golden brown. Once done, take out from oil immediately and place in a strainer to drain excess oil.

draining of recently fried banana chips

How unsweetened banana chips taste?  Just try it!

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.