The Orange Liquor

If fruit of the citrus family could not be manufactured into wine, then what are those  alcoholic beverages named after oranges? The Orange Liquor or Triple Sec?

As I told before, we had experience when almost all of our wine batches became sour a week or two after fermentation. There were even cases when wine for sale were sour too. We had very hard time figuring out the cause, examining our process tree and researching for possible solution.

The wine making project was terminated without giving us a chance to solve our problem. We discovered the cause long after. It was the citric acid that we were adding to the juice mix,(adjusting the acidity to the right level). The citric acid encourages souring of fermented wine. We should have used tartaric instead, which is the recommended acidifier.

Orange liquor is not made by fermenting, sugar and acidifier. Instead, it is made by soaking orange peels in prepared alcohol and distilling three times. Peels are of chosen variety and from what type of commodity the alcohol came from  is unknown to me. Every peel is passed through a mechanical blade removing the white bitter fibers.

Orange liquor is indeed made of orange but not orange juice. This is a great example of supposed to be waste turning to a good saleable product.

These are santunis peels. I am wondering if it could be used for making a Triple Sec like product.

old santunis peels

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

The Szincom Mandarin

The WillyBee Dalandan (Szincom Orange) Extract with Honey. How is this product related to green citrus fruits called santunis? I am not sure. Maybe they are the same, just relatives or completely different variety.

willy bee szincom mandarin orange extract honey

My taste buds suggest they are the same. This juice taste is quite similar to santunis. I did some research but very limited information about szincom orange showed up.

The greening disease of Szincom and Ladu mandarins at the Lipa Citrus Experiment Station in 1981. The fruit image provided was blur but I can tell that it is similar to trees tribing at my father’s farm. Another citrus variety called ladu was mentioned but image was not provided. (source concitver.com)

Szincom is a variety of crop called Mandarin. It could be called as Szincom Mandarine. (source: Rainfed Resources Development Project No. 492-0366 of DENR, September 30 1991, http://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PDABJ813.pdf)

It was metioned in Bureau of Agricultural Statistics (BAS) article – Jeepney loads of mandarins (szincom variety) from Quezon and Batangas were being unloaded today at Mega-Q-Mart, a major wholesale market for fruits. Deliveries of fruits from Mindanao are expected also to be shipped in today (Article entitled Trade Brisk at the Fruit Market, Period Covered – December 19 to 27, 2007, http://www.bas.gov.ph/?ids=bmsituationer&ent=218)

No further information is available. Any contribution will be appreciated.

Here more information regarding the bottled product, in case you are interested:

It is manufactured by: Victoria Foods Company, Soliven Corner MRR Street, Manggahan, Pasig City, Philippines.

Ingredients are cane sugar, dalandan (szinkom orange) extract and honey.

It should be kept in cool dry place. In refrigerator after opening.

Absolutely no preservatives added.

To prepare: 1) shake well, 2) mix about two tablespoons to one cup water, 3) serve chilled or hot.

Makes about 4.0 L of prepared beverage.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

The Taste of Sweetened Citrus Peel Strips

This is a double post about citrus peel candy. Maybe its not cause it is my very own version (without the use of thermometer).

sweetened citrus peel strips

How I did It?

1) I got the orange inside the fridge. She bought it for our toddler.

2) I sliced the fruit to eight parts. Each part has a half moon shape.

3) I peeled it off. I gave the juicy flesh to our toddler. This is one of his favorite. He was  only 11 months old but can eat a whole orange in minutes. He got a great appetite.

4) I sliced the peels to small strips. It allowed better sugar penetration and shorten the cooking time.

5) I added three tablespoons of sugar and one cup water. Brought it to slow boil.

6) I added 1/4 cup water every time the water was to shallow. I did it five times.

7) After 1 1/2 hours of slow boiling. The peels are semi transparent. I stopped addition of water and continued boiling until the syrup was about to crystallized – a rapid boil with lots of small and big bubbles and the water was almost dry.

8) I removed it from fire and transferred to a clean plate. I stirred it continuously until cool – to prevent sticking of peels together.

The verdict:

My wife: It was yummy on the first bite. However, the slightly bitter and astringent taste prevented her form eating more.

Sister: She curiously got and and munched. A very straightforward comment – Bitter!

Cook: The cook is me and non-other than me. It is indeed bitter and astringent. It is the typical taste of any citrus peel. I can taste the sweet sugar blended with bite of citrus. Then the slight bitterness follows shortly and the astringent taste kicks in.

My first impression was awful but the taste gets better and better after each strip. I was munching it one by one while writing this post and the plate was empty before I tapped the period.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Minute Maid Pulpy Orange Really Has No Preservatives?

I never know if this was only a coincidence. I bought a Minute Maid Pulpy orange and brought it home. Then while browsing the internet, I accidentally saw the Minute Maid Philippines Fan Page on Facebook.

What I noticed was the “No Preservatives Added” declaration. I got confused because base on the bottle that I bought, it has preservatives. The word preservative and stabilizer are clearly written on ingredient list.

minute made no preservative adertisement

I contacted the manufacturer to clear this matter. Here is the copy of our conversation:

You claimed that Minute Maid contains NO PRESERVATIVES. I bought minute maid yesterday and I clearly saw the “preservative” declaration on Ingredient listing. Sodium citrate and stabilizer are also preservatives.

Minute Maid Philippines
Hi Marvin. The new formulation of Minute Maid has no preservatives. May we know where you bought your bottle so we check?

Marvin Vicedo
I bought the 330 ml product from 7-eleven store Indang, Cavite Branch. The code written on label is 25APRIL11 U62213.

Minute Maid Philippines
@Marvin: thanks for the info. We’ll get back to you to confirm, but most likely the bottle you got was from the last batch of the older formulation.

minute maid ingredient listing

From then on, I am regularly visiting the store where I bought the bottle of Minute Maid. I am hoping to find the batch that has no preservatives.

After one month of observation I found a diffent bottle of Minute Maid. The product was imported from Hongkong. It has also preservative, the sodium citrate.

minute maid ingredient form another batch

Sodium Citrate belongs to Food Additive group Antioxidant Synergist and pH-control agents. pH Control Agents are substances added to change or maintain acidity or basicity, including buffers, acids and alkalies. While Antioxidant Synergists are substances used to interact with antioxidants to produce a total greater than the sum of effects produced by the synergist and the antioxidant individually. To conclude, sodium citrate is considered as preservatives due to its preserving effect by pH control and as antioxidant booster.

I am still visiting the store regularly, hoping to find what I am looking for, the Minute Maid with no added preservatives.

——

Finally I got a bottle of Minute Pulpy Orange with no added preservatives. The no preservative declaration is imprinted on label. Sodium citrate and stabilizer are still written on ingredients list but the word “preservatives” was omitted. Maybe the two ingredients are not considered as preservatives!

yet another minute maid pulpy orange

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How They Eat Dalandan, Santunis ?

In my home town, Indang, this fruit that belongs to citrus family is called dalandan or santunis. I want to know its real identity so I spent some time googling. The fruit may belong to following identities:

Citrus nobilis
Mandarin
Sweet Orange
Citrus reticulata
Citrus aurantium
Dalanghita
Dalandan
Kahel

My effort did not give the exact answer. Someone please identify its real identity! Whatever its name, it is still a citrus fruit.

dalandan

Now, we can go back to the real topic. How they eat this orange.

The picture above is an orange. The pulp is color orange but the peel is green. When the peel turns pale yellow, it will start to rot and eventually fall. Sometimes sweet and sometimes sour. I can eat all fruit part except the seeds and peels. I was amazed that some people are very meticulous in eating this fruit.

1) Some people just remove the peel. Take 1 to 3 fruit segments at a time. Chew. Then spit out the seeds.

I belong to this group.

2) Remove the peel and take time to remove all adhering fibers. Take 1 to 3 fruit segments at a time. Chew. Then spit out the seeds.

Some people never eat those beneficial fibers.

3) Remove the peels and take time to remove all adhering fibers. Take 1 to 3 fruit segments at a time. Chew. Then spit out the seeds and segment fibers.

They are throwing a lot of beneficial fibers.

4) Remove the peels and take time to remove all adhering fibers. Take 1 to 3 fruit segments and dip it in rock salt before chewing. Then spit out the seeds and segment fibers.

Why do they need to add salt to a delicious orange?.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.