Coffee Pulp Wine and other Beverages

I thought about it before. Making wine out of coffee pulp. What I wanted is to crush the red ripe coffee berries, strong enough just to break it open and able to separate the pulp from precious seeds. The seeds then can be dried and rind ferment separately into fine wine.

There is another way do it for Arabica beans. The variety is normally wet processed. They are soaked in water for certain period before separation of pulp and seeds. In short, it undergo fermentation process. Maybe it can be tweaked so the resulting liquid is wine or can be converted further to such.

In cacao fermentation, the drippings, a by-product, is collected and made into wine or vinegar. It is possible for coffee too. Several cacao processors are already considering buying the cocoa pod instead. Do fermentation in their own factory to take advantage of those extra products. This also provides better control over bean quality.

There, still, a third way to do it. From the google news food and wine topic. Matt Poli of the Catbird Seat was able to make a fine beverage out of dried coffee husk. In summary, he is steeping the dried cascara and adding with flavors of his liking. I ate red ripe coffee cherries before so I have a rough idea what it taste like.

FYI: The pulp plus rind when dried is called husk , shell or cascara. Before I leave the university life, my colleagues were working on a machine to convert those husk to charcoal bricket.

From the website of Starbucks. The company is serving variety of cascara drinks. I am not a fan of coffee shops so I cannot assure these are available locally. Lucky you if they have. You got a chance to try. Considering how big the company is, they are sure making a lot money from meant to be trash.

Drying before husking is done mainly for Robusta beans. If hygienically prepared, which is not in practice, can be really made to any drink of choice. Tea (and related products) out of cacao shells is possible. However, there is a danger of ochratoxin and heavy metals contamination. Those who still see it as venture should provide safety certificates before selling to public. Hope this is not the case for choice husk.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Defining Non-Alcoholic Beverage | Featuring Cali Pineapple Flavor

Cali Non-Alcoholic Beverage, Pineapple Flavor. What does it mean? Does it mean it has no alcohol, specifically ethyl alcohol or ethanol. If it is true then all the drinks that never go fermentation, brewing and addition of ethanol belongs to the category non-alcoholic. I am sure there is something weird hidden in the term so lets go start digging.

non-alcoholic cali pineapple flavor

Here are the ingredients list. Ingredients: Water, Sugar, Malt, Citric Acid, Cereals, Artificial Pineapple Flavor, Caramel, Acesulfame-K, Hops and Anti-Oxidant.

The three listed items are primary ingredients for beer making, the Malt, Cereal and Hops.

The cereal may refer to any popular grain but probably it is none other than barley. Malt is sprouted cereal which contains several variations of  sugar namely: glucose, maltose, maltotriose and maltodextrines.  Popular use of malt is for beer brewing but is also being used for vinegar, bread and flavored beverage. Hops are flower of the hop plant. It is use to balance and bitter the beer flavor.

Expertly Brewed and Package by:

Brewed is the past tense of brew and brew is the technical term for beer making process.

So Cali is basically a beer. A non-alcoholic beer. Enough for the thinking and let us look for the real definition.

According to wiki it is a beverage with less than 0.5% alcohol. The drink still undergoes the standard brewing process. Then the alcohol is removed by distilling it out.

I think the non-alcoholic beverage is not manufactured as intended. Expertly brewing the beer just to throw the precious ethanol out is absurd. It was supposed to be a waste product of whiskey product.  The remaining liquid with minimal alcohol content and flavor are re-processed as non-alcoholic flavored beverages. An excellent idea that reduces waste and adds more product lines.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

The Abandoned Fermented Wines

What is on the other side of the black curtain? I am guessing you already knew the answer, the article title has already told you. Plus there is a picture suggestive of what it is below.

black curtains  made of trash bags

The curtain is actually a group of large black trash bags attached together using masking tape. Behind it is a large shelf with lots of 5-gallon capacity water container. Each container contains fermented wines from three years ago. They are abandoned wine. No one dared continuing the process after the project funding got terminated. A sad story.

Are the wines still good? I do not know yet. Maybe throwing them away is the best option.

abandoned fermented wines

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Bubod Pineapple Wine Final Update

After over three weeks time. I visited the bubod pineapple wine trial again. No bubble formations observed. It ceased, signalling fermentation end.

The smell. The aroma was like a strong wine. The taste. It had a good wine taste, a taste resembling fruit cider. It was good if not too sour. Well, it is good if I label it as vinegar.

fermented pineapple bubod

Where did the sour taste came from? Maybe I was too careless. The pineapple juice got contaminated during the process. Or the bubod itself was also responsible for sour taste.

I guess I need to repeat this crude method in a more scientific manner. Well, the main purpose of this trial is to know whether the stored bubod was still viable or not. Trying to get a good tasting wine was supposed to be a bonus.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Tasting The Two-Year Old Tapuy

This is a two-year old tapuy wine. It doesn’t look like it but it really is. Brown sugar was responsible for golden appearance. I am going to taste it again after two long years.

My good expectation. Wine during aging undergoes flavor development. Flavors that cannot be found in newly fermented wines, in a process that is not yet well explained by science. This wine should have a very nice taste.

tapuy wine in minute made pet

My bad expectation. The PET packaging affected the flavor. This is a usual experience. When PET meant for juice is used for other purposes, such as   water storage and the likes, the content gain off taste.

A short tapuy story. Way back year 2010, in the entrepreneurial seminar I attended, one of the participants brought a liter of tapuy wine. Each attendee  took a shot. Then when my turn came, I saved a hefty amount in a 330 ml bottle.  I stored it in refrigerator and let it stayed there for two years.

The brief verdict. The taste is significantly smoother than before. However, the plastic imparted taste and aroma to wine. It is slightly perceptible but has a significant downward impact.

PET bottles are lightweight and cost less. It has gained popularity as container for instant juices, teas and carbonated beverages. But when it comes to wine,  the glass bottle is still the standard choice.  A friend of mine used to pack his wine in elegant plastic bottle. He eventually shifted to glass bottle for one reason. Most customers still prefer wine in glass bottles. Maybe he has another reason that he never revealed, the plastic packaging tend to impart off flavor to wines.

 

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.