Visiting Agrilink, Foodlink and Aqualink 2013

It is October 21 already but I guess it is not too late to share my experiences during the past Agrilink, Foodlink and Aqualink. The event was held at World Trade Center Manila last October 10-12.

Many exhibitors were present during the past exhibitions I attended so my tendency was to skip them and look for the newcomers and anything that I haven’t seen before.

There were several games on B-MEG booth. A basketball shooting game and hitting the lever with a hammer to ring the bell on top. Rewards were given for every participants hitting the goal. I tried the “lever and bell thing” but it got damaged after receiving my mighty hit. It was too bad, I got only a blue ballpen.

bmeg games

Look, Mighty Camote in nice corrugated cartons. It was obviously intended for export.

mighty kamote sweet potato

The Packaging Division of the Department of Science and Technology was a rare sight. For those who are in need of their services, their office is within DOST compound at Bicutan, Taguig.

itdi dost packaging division

Electronic grinding machines. I am scouting a type suitable for roasted cacao. Items on display never suited my expectations. I picked one brochure and found few candidates. They are not replying to my email inquiry though.

grinding machines

There is coconut sugar and also a coconut flour. I think it is a ground coconut meat after extraction of oil rich fluid. From the booth of Philippine Coconut Authority.

coconut sugar and coconut flour

Plastic for storing grains. From GrainPro Inc.

grain storage plastic bag

Organic eggs. Looks like native chicken eggs.

organic egg

A machine for removing chicken feathers. Do not buy if you intend to use it for native chickens. Their feathers are way harder to remove the broilers.

chicken defeathering machine

PET Jars. My good friend was looking for this for a long time. I never thought I would find it in this event. Jars by FilPet. It is good for business starters. There is no minimum volume required.

filpet pet jars

Pako, the edible ferns. Oh, I couldn’t remember when was the last time I had it.

pako edible ferns

Ceramic knives. The promodizer said: It is good for slicing apples. It is non-reactive and never cause browning. He showed me two apple cuts. The one cut by ceramic knife never had discoloration. The other had, the one cut with regular stainless steel knife.

ceramic knives set

Unoy Champorado Blend. This idea was really nice. A ready to cook champorado. No need to add chocolate. The cooking instructions said: Just boil one cup blend with 15 cups of water and stir until cooked. Serve with milk and sugar. I think it would be nicer if a pack with added sugar and milk exist.

unoy champorado mix

A solar powered insect trap. I am hoping the broiler raiser near our area buy several of this item. The flies coming from their poultry houses are so annoying.

solar powered insect trap

There are so many things that I want to share but my fingers are not enough to do the talking.

 

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Visiting The Food and Drink Asia 2013

This was Food and Drink Asia 2013. I had a complimentary ticket courtesy of Philippine Food Service Equipment and Supplies Corporation. It was thanks to them, my entrance was free.

food and drink asia entranceOh! There were entrance restrictions. I never see these often. Age 14 and below were not allowed to enter. Persons in shorts, sandos and sandals were not allowed too. However, I saw few who were beating the dress code. There were two minors staying in the lobby while their mom was inside. I couldn’t help wonder why minors were restricted.

The issued pass is also valid until next week event, The Asian Food Expo 2013. I am saving it in case I have enough time to visit World Trade Center again.

The sad part was, the event management was not giving out certificate of appearance. It is a necessity for government employees visiting the event. The customer service representative was unfriendly and seemed to know a little about her work. Making her sign our own certificate of appearance form took us a while.

The entrance should be entrance only but few were exiting via entrance. It was understandable, those rule breakers were part of event management.

It was a side by side event. Food and Drink Exhibition and Food Franchising. At first, it seemed only one booth was geared toward franchising. I rest and roamed around several times and noticed there were quite a number.

What I saw?
– meat products
– coffee and products
– drinks
– ice cream
– siopao, siomai and related
– a lot of free food samples.

Almost every booth were offering a small piece of their products. Buying lunch was not necessary. There were few restaurant booths in case freebies were not enough.

cooking miguelitoI usually not into listening seminars or watching contest. However, this time, because we were waiting for someone, I had ample time to spare and partly watch the 4th Philippine Mixology Cup Ultimate Flair Challenge. It was a bar tending contest. From my own point of view, it was a show of bottle and glass throwing and flipping skills with the less focus on drink’s taste.  I never finished the show.

ultimate flair challengeI would like to say thanks to Agrinurture Inc. who gave me free awesome coffee. It made my day complete. Also thanks to Department of Agriculture for allowing us to rest in their conference room type booth.

tully

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

26th BAR Exhibit, Free Taste Round-up

Here are the list of products offering free taste during the recently concluded BAR exhibit. Tasting them all was exciting.

1) Arius Wine from the plant Podocarpus costalis, locally known as arius. The fruit is like a small version of cashew with a different color make. Free taste to serious customers and curious visitors. It was exhibited by Batanes State University.

arius wine batanes state college

2) Wine. Another wine free taste from UPLB booth. I think it was more developed than above.

wine uplb

3) The three bagoong guisado variants; the sweet, regular and spicy (?). Get three mango slices and dip each in bagoong on saucers. The patis on the side could be tasted via another mango slice. From BFAR Central.

bagoong gisado bfar central

4) The hopia malitbuganon from DA-RFU 8. This extra wide hopia is as wide as regular rice serving tray. Ask the booth personnel how it taste and she will let you get a small piece, then hide it after. Let’s not blame her, many exhibit goers are just looking freebies.

hopia malitbuganon

5) I was wondering why there are offering free pineapple slices. Maybe, pineapples are not created equal. Their pineapple fruits taste better than others.

free pineapple slices

6) Sweet sorghum porridge. Too bad for me, they ran out of stock.

sorghum pirridge by bapamin

7) Yet another bagoong guisado, Alavar Brand, from BFAR 9.

mango bagon gata bfar 9

8)  This one only lasted for about 15 minutes. A buko salad imitation using seaweed strips. You’ll never know its seaweeds until it touches your tongue.

seaweeds ala buko salad bfar car

seaweeds strips bfar car

9) Pickled mango and dried mango strips from Pangasinan Tropical.

pickled mango and dried mango strips free taste

pickled mango and dried mango strips

10) Lechon and sausage from BT Black Pig. The Bureau of Animal Industry did bring the two black pigs inside their booth.

bt black native pig products bai

 

bt black native pigs bai

11)  The healthier version of cane sugar, the muscovado.

muscovado by carrd

 

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Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

28 Local Wine Products

I reviewed all the pictures I’d taken during the exhibit. I was a bit surprised to discover that there were a total of local 28 wine products exhibited. Some are very popular products, some are known while are others were completely new to my senses.

1) Abiu ?

duhat and abui wine

2) Adlai, yet another product from adlai grain.
3) Arius, the fruit looks like an a violet and small version of cashew.

arius wine

4) Banana

banana wine

5) Basi, from sugar cane
6) Bignay, bugnay

bugnay and basi wine

7) Blueberry
8) Cashew

cashew wine

9) Chico
10) Coconut, wine from coconut is different from lambanog.

coconut wine

11) Duhat, lomboy, both refer to black plum.
12) Guyabano, the anti-cancer fruit goes alcoholic.
13) Jackfruit
14) Lipote
15) Oregano, a wine from herbal leaf.
16) Mango, green mango
17) Mangosteen
18) Paratungon, a centerpiece of MIMAROPA booth.

paratungon wine

19) Pineapple
20) Raspberry
21) Santol
22) Sapinit
23) Tamarind
24) Tambis

tambis jackfruit and guyabano wine

25) Ube
26) Yacon
27) Ybanay?
28) Zuriel?

bignay zuriel and chico wine

I remember a sad story of my good friend. He was marketing his very own made wine. However, most wine seller were saying, “We never carry local wines”. If we could change our “like-imported” attitude, it would help a lot in uplifting our local wine industry.

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Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Adlai Products

Adlai production and consumption is being promoted by the Department of Agriculture together with various state colleges and universities. The grain is a rich source of energy and so a good alternative to rice, corn, potato and perhaps wheat products.

Adlai, based on anecdotal literature, has good eating quality, grow well in non-irrigated areas and requires low farm inputs. However, other people have negative opinion. How can it be a good rice alternative if its grain yield is relatively low and can only be harvested two times a year. I guess more research has to be done to make it as prolific as rice and erase those negatives. The long and tedious series of variety selection, breeding, testing and field trials.

I think the area of food technology is an easier field. People has already developed various food products using Adlai.

1) Pure adlai flour. It can be made into any bakery goods provided with right amount of wheat flour or any gluten substitute. I wonder if it can also be cooked as rice milk.

pure adlai flour

2) The adlai health drink. I think it was adapted from oatmeal and other oatmeal based drink.

golden adlai and health drink

3) Adlai golden. I am sure it is not a genetically modified adlai with beta carotene. I think it was added with food coloring or stuff with a color yellow complexion, eg margarine.

4) Adlai Maki Sushi. A proof that it can be used on your favorite maki. It might not be as good or it might taste even better.

maki shusi adlai

5) Adlai Coffee. A coffee alternative that has no caffeine. It is organically grown. Added with coconut sugar. Contains free-radical scavenging antioxidants.

adlai kape

6) Adlai suman and peche peche. I never know if adlai is glutenous or not. These two native products are suggesting me it is.

adlai suman peche peche

7) Adlai crunch, chips and puffed. I hope they are as crunchy and as tasty as they sound.

adlai crunch and chips

Researchers from Bicol State University presented a wide range of products. They have chocolate energy drink, nutri meal, kropek, coffee, 4-in-1 nutri bar, puffed and toasted adlai rice puto.

bicol state university adlai products

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update as of June 2018

No big news about adlai yet. Do the various projects failed to deliver satisfactory results? There are many other rice alternatives and  yet we are still highly dependent on it. For this year alone, we already have several wave of rice importations. How can we manage growing alternatives if we cannot attend to the basics. I think the above product images were just for show.

 

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.