Sour Tasting Hot Dogs and Other Processed Meat

Have you ever eaten a sour hot dog?  I have. Not once, but several times already. I thought it was okay. I was thinking there were brands formulated to have slightly acidic taste. Not to differentiate flavor but to extend its shelf life further.

I began suspecting after tasting a sour chicken nuggets. It shouldn’t taste like that.



I can’t find any article about sour tasting hot dog and other processed meats so I am posting my educated guess. Take not that it is not valid until scientifically proven.  I mean subjecting newly processed products under laboratory experiments.

Many have this common ingredient. The table sugar. It has three purposes. First is lowering water activity thus preventing microbial spoilage. Second, prevent the toughening effect of salt. That was what I learnt from my college professor. Third is act as flavor enhancer.

Accept the fact. Process meats that we love are made from scrap and low quality raw materials. Mostly trimmings, backfats, ligaments and poor tasting carabeef. Manufacturers need to add flavor enhancers to make it more appealing to us, especially kids.

Meat products, even though has preservatives, need to be in frozen state. They are unintentionally thawed when on display in public market stalls. Frozen after the day and thawed again the next day. This practice gives way to spoilage microorganism entry and growth.

Yeast converting sugars to alcohol. Then alcohol to acetic acid by certain bacterial species. Other probable cause of souring is growth of lactic acid bacteria under anaerobic conditions. Vacuum packed products are likely to suffer this spoilage type.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Grilled Pig Ear and Head Skin, Inihaw na Tainga at Balat ng Baboy

Ingredients:
1/2 pig ear and head skin, cut about 1 x 1 inch
1 tablespoon patis, fish sauce
1/2 tablespoon salt
3 tomatoes, sliced – can be replaced with tomato sauce
2 medium onions, sliced
1 clove garlic, minced
3/4 cup banana ketchup
1 teaspoon black pepper
3/4 cup water

Procedure:
1) Cook the pig ear and head skin adobo style. Mix all the ingredients in a suitable cooking vessel. Cook over a low fire until the though skin can be prick easily by a barbecue stick. Do not overcook.

pig ear and head skin

2) Cool and transfer to a clean container. It can be stored in refrigerator for later use.

adobong teynga at balat ng baboy

3) Arrange the adobo pieces through a barbecue stick. Grill it over a charcoal stove for 3o minutes. Turn sides  and brush with adobo sauce every two  minutes.

inihaw ng teynga ng baboy

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How to Make Chicken Intestine Barbecue, Isaw

Before the chicken intestines are thrown away, no use for it. Now, the intestines are cleaned and sold as isaw (chicken intestine barbecue) by street vendors.

Procedure:
1) Buy chicken intestine only from trusted retailer. Some vendors never clean it thoroughly. The remaining waste materials inside the intestines are not edible and will only add weight to your purchase.
2) Clean the intestines again by gently squeezing it with fingers to remove some remaining waste. Option 2. Open the intestines with scissors and clean it with running water. Option 3. Pass a running water through the intestine by using a small water hose.
3) Prick a desired length through a barbecue stick.

raw isaw on stick

4) Grill it over a medium temperature charcoal stove for 30 minutes. Turn and brush with marinade (a mixture of cooking oil, banana ketchup, soy sauce, oyster sauce and chili sauce) every 2 minutes.

5) Other ingredients of choice can be added to marinade. Grilling time can be shortened by increasing stove temperature. Take caution to prevent burning of barbecue.

grilling isaw

broiling isaw

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Inihaw na Dugo, Grilled Chicken Blood

I asked my mom to buy me chicken blood. I want to eat some inihaw na dugo but I don’t want to buy from street vendors. I want to grill my own blood barbecue.

Chicken blood is preferred for grilling purposes because its texture is the  firmest among other animal blood.

Pre-cooked chicken blood can be bought from dressed chicken vendors. All you need to do is cut it do desired sizes and prick it through a barbecue stick. Take care not to break blood slices.

block of chicken blood

Grill the blood barbecue over a charcoal stove for  5 to 30 minutes. High temperatures hasten cooking time.  Brush with mixture of  cooking oil, ketchup and soy sauce. I also add oysters sauce and chili sauce.

chicken blood on stick

I prefer a slow grilling over low temperature charcoal stove. It allows greater absorption of  sauce and development of flavors.

grilled chicken blood

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How to Cook Chicken Adobo

Adobo is the Spanish term for seasoning mix or marinade. A kind of marinade – mixtures of vinegar or wine and oil with various spices and seasonings; used for soaking foods before cooking. Ingredients and cooking style may vary from region to region.

I asked my father how to cook adobo. Maybe this is the Cavite version. This recipe uses tomato to replace vinegar.

Ingredients:
1/2 kilogram chicken, large cuts
1 tablespoon patis, fish sauce
1/2 tablespoon salt
3 tomatoes, sliced – can be replaced with tomato sauce
2 medium onions, sliced
1 clove garlic, minced
3/4 cup banana ketchup
1 teaspoon black pepper

Procedure:
1) Place all the ingredients in a cooking vessel.
2) Add small amount of water.
3) Bring to a slow boil for 30 minutes. Cover while boiling. Adjust amount of salt, black pepper, banana ketchup and fish sauce to suit your taste.

adobong manok

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.