How to Make Natural Pineapple Juice

Canned pineapple juice is now third to canned tomato juice and orange juice in terms of volume (world production). It is an excellent juice for canning, since it retains its fresh flavour and aroma remarkably well and is of an acidity and sugar content such that it is properly balanced in flavour.

Pineapple juice is a by-product obtained during the canning of pineapple slices or rings in syrup. The principal raw materials from which pineapple juice is prepared are the shredded meat obtained from the inner portion of the peels left after the peeling of the pineapple, the small pineapple that is too small for canning, the trimmed cores and the juice drippings from the crushed pineapple.

Small pineapples are peeled. The peeled, small pineapple cores and eradicated meat are shredded; the juice is extracted and then passed through a finisher. The juice thus obtained is blended with sugar syrup, pasteurized and filled into sterilized cans. The cans are sealed hot (“hot-seal” process), cooled, labelled and packaged.

Procedure:
1. Boiling water, lemon juice and sugar are added to the pulp so that the mixture contains 12% TSS (total soluble solids) as determined by a refractometer and pH of 3.5 to 3.8.
2. The composition of ingredients is as follows:

a. boiling water: 1 litre/kg of pulp;
b. sugar: 200 g/kg of pulp; for health reasons, brown sugar is preferred.
c. lemon juice: 2 spoons/kg of pulp.

3. Bottles are filled and capped with a manual capper. Pasteurize at 70 degree Centigrade for 15 minutes
4. Allow the bottles to cool in the same container till the following morning then wash, label and store them.

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Notes:
Measure the following physico-chemical properties and and adjust accordingly to your set standard. These properties should be uniform every batch. Adjustments can be computed using Pearson’s Square formula.

a. sugar content. Sugar concentration can be increased by adding sugar or can be lowered by adding water or pulp.
b. pH. This can be lowered by adding citric acid or can be increased by adding water or pulp.
c. titrable acidity. Same as in (a), just replace sugar with citric acid. Be cautious because citric acid affects both pH and titrable acidity.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How to Make Mango Bar

Wash ripe mangoes, peel and cut into pieces using stainless steel knife. Blend using
heavy duty waring blender.

Adjust total soluble solids to 25% by addition of sugar. Adjust the pH to 3.5-4 by addition of calamansi juice or citric acid. See notes below.

If you don’t have the equipment to adjust TSS and pH, follow these formula then.

sugar: 10 to 15% of the weight of the pulp
calamansi juice: 2 spoons per kg of pulp
sodium erythorbate: 2 g per kg of pulp

Heat the pulp for two minutes at 70 to 80 degree C. Then pour into aluminum trays
coated with glycerin. Glycerin facilitates the removal of dried pulp. Pulp
thickness should be one inch. Adjust depending on preference.

Dry in a solar dryer or oven at temperature of 70 degree C until the product has
consistency of a leather. Or dry until the moisture content is 15%. A fast and efficient drying oven is recommended. Sun drying might take too long and allow contamination and mold growth.

Cut the dried mango bar, wrap individually using candy wrapper then pack neatly in
tightly sealed container.

Notes:
a. sugar content. Sugar concentration can be increased by adding sugar or lowered by adding water or pulp.
b. pH. This can be lowered by adding citric acid or increased by adding water or pulp.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How to Make Yellow Mango Sauce

Feel like kicking those tomato sauce and banana catsup? Maybe its time to try the Yellow Mango Sauce!

The ingredients needed: 3 pieces ripe mangoes or 600 grams mango puree, 2 1/2 cups of water, 1/2 cup sugar, 1/4 cup cornstarch, 1 tbsp iodized salt, 1 clove garlic, 1/2 piece onion, 1/2 tsp white pepper and 3/4 cup vinegar.

ripe carabao mango 4

The processing procedure:

1. Wash ripe mangoes and cut into halves.
2. Scoop the meat.
3. Prepare the other ingredients and mix into scooped mangoes.
4. Blend the mixture in a stainless steel stockpot, stirring constantly until temperature reaches 82ºC.
5. Remove from heat and pack immediately into clean and tightly sealed bottle.

source: fits – guimaras

Do you have other version of this recipe? Share it here!

Notes: Measure the following physico-chemical properties and and adjust accordingly to your set standard. These properties should be uniform every batch. Adjustments can be computed using Pearson’s Square formula.

a. sugar content. Sugar concentration can be increased by adding sugar or lowered by adding water or pulp.
b. pH. This can be lowered by adding citric acid or increased by adding water or pulp.
c. titrable acidity. Same as in (a), just replace sugar with citric acid. Be cautious because citric acid affects both pH and titrable acidity.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How to Make Dried Mango and Papaya

Ingredients:
rare ripe  mango, mature green is also applicable
refined sugar
confectioner’s sugar
sodium metabisulfite or sodium erythorbate (food grade)

Many countries banned the use of sodium metabisulfite. Use sodium erythorbate instead.

Materials and Equipment:
stainless-steel knife
mechanical drier
wire trays lined with sinamay or bamboo trays
cheesecloth
stove
OPP or PE plastic bags of 0.003 mm thickness, popular plastic bags are now made of polypropylene, PP

dried-mango

Procedure:

  • Wash mangoes to remove surface dirt.
  • Peel mangoes using stainless steel peeler; slice along its lateral axis from both sides of the middle seed section, and cut the cheeks into pieces with a thickness of approximately 1.5cm.
  • Add white sugar (30% by weight) to mango slices. The sugar is allowed to melt in the mangoes. (Another method of syruping is by quick process in which 25% of sugar and 75% of water is prepared into syrup by boiling then cool and add to the mango slices.)
  • Heat the mangoes until the slices become translucent. Cool.
  • Add 0.1% of sodium metabisulfite or sodium erythorbate (1 g for every kilogram of mango slices). Mix thoroughly.
  • Soak mangoes in syrup for at least 18-20 hours. Drain. Rinse slices with running water.
  • Lay slices on trays lined with cheesecloth. Dry in a cabinet drier at 60-65 degree centigrade for 10-14 hours. Drying may be done in a solar drier as long as drying area is clean and free from dust and flies.
  • Remove from trays and loosely pack dried mangoes in polypropylene bags and store at ambient condition for 18-24 hours.
  • Roll in confectioner’s sugar and remove excess coating through straining.
  • Pack and seal in polypropylene bags of 0.003″ thickness.
  • Store in dry and cool place.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How to Make Banana Chips

Ingredients:
100 pieces Saba banana (unripe)
1 kg sugar
1 gallon cooking oil

Materials and Equipment:
Banana Slicer or knife
Deep fryer
Strainer
PP bags
Basins

banana-chips-shiny

Procedure:
1) To prepare syrup, mix one kg of sugar with one liter of water. Boil for 30 minutes. Cool. Adjust sweetness intensity by adding or lessening sugar quantity.
2) Select good and uniform sizes of bananas. Green  plantain bananas are recommended. Eating bananas like latundan and lakatan do not have enough starch requirement. Ripe tend to darken and resist crispiness during frying.
3) Wash it thoroughly until all the adhering dirt are removed.
4) Peel the bananas and cut both pointed ends. Peel by lifting the skin of with knife. It is tricky and hard at first. You’ll get used to it eventually.
5) Place the peeled bananas in basin of water to prevent browning and to wash off latex.
6) Slice the bananas uniformly. Thickness should be 1/16 inch. Use a guided knife, a manual slicer or a machine slicer capable of high speed work.
7) Heat the cooking oil up to 270°F. In absence of candy thermometer, monitor by placing a  slice in oil, it is ready when rapid bubbling appears on sides. Cook the sliced bananas for 15 minutes or until crispy. Remove from oil and cool.
8) Soak the crispy chips into syrup for 3 minutes. Drain. Store the remaining syrup and use it for the next batch.
9) Cooked in oil (270°F) for 5 to 10 minutes. Try to separate slices which are sticking together.
10) Remove the chips from oil. Place on manila paper or clean towel to drain off excess oil. Turn at interval to facilitate draining.
11) Pack into PP bags or other suitable containers.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.