The Sweetened Green Mango Peels

I am thinking what can I do with the green mango peels every time I eat. No problem with the ripe mangoes – peels can be processed to expensive wine and awesome vinegar. Maybe it can be made to green mango peel wine. The green mango wine is existing. The thing in my mind could be possible.

Lets try the green mango peel wine some other time. I will go for sweetened green mango feel for now. Is it crazy? Think again!

Why are we throwing away the peels? More nutrients are concentrated near it. Peeling and throwing it away mean discarding considerable amount of essential nutrients. Have you experienced eating it. Green mango peels taste bland and sometimes slightly bitter. It is also tougher. Eating it might not be enjoyable but not totally bad. The taste could be enhance by simple processing.

The product has a sweet and sour taste and a texture somewhat similar to gummy candies. A person in a blindfold will never realized that he is eating a mango peels.

sweetened green mango peels

How to:

1) Set aside the peels every time you have a raw mango snack. Store it in refrigerator for later use.

2) Mix one cup water and five tablespoons sugar. Bring to slow boil and add enough green mango peels.

3) Continue boiling until the flesh attached to peels are semi transparent. Then boil for another 15 minutes to allow more sugar penetration in peels.

4) Remove from fire and strain. The sweet and sour syrup left can still be used for other purposes (think it for yourself).

5) Dry under the sun and roll over a confectioner sugar to make a dried green mango peels. Alternatively, you can adapt the procedure for making dried mango and papaya.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Rambutan is not Fit for Food Processing?

Have you noticed that there are very few products made of rambutan. Try searching super malls, groceries, supermarket and the like. if your not lucky, finding products made of rambutan is going to be a hard task.

In fact, this delicious fruit can be manufactured into variety of products. Products may include jam, juice, preserves, marmalade, jellies and as flavoring to other food commodities. So what makes rambutan not suitable for food processing?

When I was still a Student Worker in my alma mater, our boarding house was inside the fruit plantation and animal project area. An approximate of ten rambutan trees can be found around the boarding house. I have three buddies living with me there. Every fruiting season, we secretly eat ripe rambutan fruits. I can eat one to two kilograms of it and still craving for more. This fruit is so delicious, clients keep on coming to ask for a fresh pick. The fruits are readily exhausted in just two weeks from the time of ripening.

My mother has one rambutan tree in her front yard. During fruiting season, I can barely see a red ripe rambutan because they are getting the fruit in their rare-ripe stage, manibalang.

Rambutan is expensive but very salable fruit. We barely experience a surplus of supply. Why bother processing it to jam, juice and other products if it can be sold easily at for a high price.

rambutan

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How to Make Coconut Chips

INGREDIENTS
coconuts
refined sugar

UTENSILS
sharp knife
mechanical slicer
carajay/sauce pan
stainless steel spoon

dehusked coconut

PACKAGING MATERIAL
Paper/Polyethylene or Paper/Foil/Polyethylene bags

PROCEDURE
1. Pierce eyes of the coconut and allow water to drain.
2. Preheat oven at 177°C (350°F) and put dewatered coconut until it cracks.
3. Remove the coconut meat from the shell and parings.
4. Slice the coconut meat with a peeler.
5. Mix thoroughly 2 parts slices with 1 part sugar.
6. Stand for 30 minutes and drain.
7. Dry in drier at 70°C (158°F) for 2 hours.
8. Toast in oven till golden brown.

Technology courtesy of DOST Tekno Pangkabuhayan.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How to Make Mango Jam

INGREDIENTS
ripe mangoes (carabao or piko variety)
refined white sugar
citric acid

PACKAGING MATERIAL
sterilized glass jars with PVC caps

mango flesh and skin

UTENSILS/SUPPLIES
Waring blender or a coarse sieve
stainless steel knives
stainless steel mixing bowls
measuring cups
wooden spoon

PROCEDURE
1. Weigh, sort ripe mangoes.
2. Wash in clean tap water to remove surface dirt.
3. Soak in 200 ppm chlorinated water for 10 minutes to reduce microbial load.
4. Drain.
5. Slice mango into halves. Scoop-out edible flesh.
6. Pass through Waring blender or coarse sieve.
7. Mix the pulp with an equivalent amount of sugar.
8. Heat over low fire, stirring constantly. When almost thick, add 0.3% citric acid based on the weight of the pulp used.
9. Continue heating until temperature is 105°C (221°F) or until the mixture can be spooned out.
10. Fill into sterilized jars. Seal tightly.
11. Air cool. Label and store.

Technology courtesy of DOST Tekno Pangkabuhayan.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How to Make Coco Jam

INGREDIENTS
grated coconut
brown sugar
glucose (corn syrup)

coconut meat

UTENSILS
expeller or press
stainless steel cooking vessel
stainless steel spoon or ladle
stove

PACKAGING MATERIAL
sterilized glass jars with new PVC caps

PROCEDURE
1. Extract coconut milk. Add lukewarm water to shredded coconut. Mash it well and extract the milk by pressing a handful between palms. Repeat twice.
2. Boil extracts slowly until soft curds and oily streaks appear on top of the boiling milk.
3. Add brown sugar (2 parts: 5 parts boiled milk) and boil for another 20 minutes.
4. Pour in glucose (½ the amount of sugar used) and continue boiling until done over low fire, stirring frequently to prevent burning. End point is reached when a drop of the cooked materials in cold water forms a soft ball.
5. Cool and pour in sterilized containers and seal completely. Cool and label.

Technology courtesy of DOST Tekno Pangkabuhayan.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.