San Miguel and Purefoods CD Rack

Don’t be deceived by the looks. They looks like real San Miguel Pale Pilsen cases but they are CD racks enough to fit 14 CDs each. They are manufactured as souvenirs. I bought them from Synergos, the dealer of generic bottle packaging.

Are you interested. Find them at 33 Quezon Ave. Brgy Lourdes, Quezon City . Or you can call Tel No. 712-7030.

san-miguel-cd-case

This one has Purefoods logo. Obviously, meat products are not meant for beer cases.

purefoods-cd-case

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

A Taste of Magnifico Rackey Coffee Royal

Every Saturday morning is market day. As usual, I and her went to market to buy one week food supply. As we entered the market, I noticed small cups of coffee everywhere. The cup is made of paper. In short, its a paper cup. The coffee seller must have a great love for environment. They are using biodegradable cups.

Just before we left the place, I saw a small kiosk giving out coffee samples. We got curious. We went near the kiosk immediately to have a cup. Its free. Pinoy really loves free foods.

The kiosk sells Magnifico Rackey Coffee Royal 3-in-1 coffee. They got a long name eh! They are giving out free coffee samples to attract more customers.

magnifico-coffee-royal

I bought one box for 35 pesos. The box contains ten instant coffee sachets plus two free. Thirty five pesos divided by twelve coffee sachets equals three pesos. Its a good deal!

While writing this, I made a cold coffee to drink. The taste is a little bit bitter than Nescafe 3-in-1 but its just fine. I hate too much sugar. You guys need to try this one.

Time to cite the ingredients. The product contains coffee creamer, sugar and natural and artificial flavors.

cold coffee

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

The Making of Arenga Pinnata Vinegar

I listed the names to avoid further confusions.

English name: Sugar palm
Filipino common name: Irok or Kaong
Scientific name: Arennga pinnata

Arengga pinnata vinegar became a popular product of Indang. In fact, it became the town’s entry in “One Town, One Product” program of previous Gov. Ayong Maliksi. Town folks celebrates Arengga Festival every year.

The product gave fortune to those few businessmen but not to mangangarit. Arengga vinegar is marketed as natural health remedy. I became a hit in local and export market. I never question its effectiveness because I am using it to cure my cough and soar throat.

Mangangarit do the hard job of collecting sweet sap of sugar palm. They know very well how to turn it to vinegar. The problems lie between packaging and product marketing. The lack of money to buy good packaging materials and to market the product effectively. I hope the local government can do something about this.

kakaong-vinegar-in-earthen-jar

Arengga vinegar can be easily made by fermenting fresh sap into plastic or earthen jar until it becomes sour. Then pack into plastic bottles and place under the heat of sun for few days. The very common package is a used 1.5 liters Coke bottle.

Quality control is a must to sustain product quality. Technical knowledge should be shared by research institution.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

Sugar Palm Fruit Makes You Feel Itchy !

My father used to harvest half-ripe sugar palm fruits. Immediately after picking, they were boiling the fruits to give it a soft jelly-like consistency. It is then pricked out with a short sharp stick. Soaked and washed in several changes of water for few days. The jelly-like flesh called “kaong” was ready for market. It is use for sweet delicacies.

However, that’s not the main issue . Then process mentioned above always make my body very itchy. They told me to stop talking while the process is on-going. Talking makes me feel itchy? I guessed not.

Half-ripe sugar palm fruits contains high levels of irritating oxalate crystals, calcium oxalate. It is a chemical compound that forms needle-shaped structures. It plays an important role in development of kidney stones.  Some oxalate containing foods are sweet potatoes, black indian tea, okra, chocolate, soybean crackers, peanuts, swiss chard, wheat germ, spinach, beets and rhubarb.

Oxalate crystals is poisonous when ingested. Even small doses of oxalate toxin is enough to cause intense sensations of burning in the mouth and throat, swelling, and choking.  Larger doses cause severe digestive upset, breathing difficulties,  convulsions, coma and death. Recovery from severe oxalate poisoning is possible, but permanent liver and kidney damage is irreversible.

You don’t have to worry . Oxalate crystals reside only on walls and stalk of fruits. The processed “kaong” is  safe to eat. Itching can be prevented by wearing gloves and long sleeves while processing.

itchy-sugar-palm-fruits


updated: May 2017

Medscape.com has clearer explanation regarding calcium oxalate. It is a water insoluble salt that forms a bundle of needle-like crystals called raphides. Contact with moisture causes plant cells to eject these raphides, which may come contact with skin or mucosal surfaces. Raphides longer than 180 micros are believed to be more potent. Upon skin contact, they allow entry of other irritant such as proteases, saponins etc.

So calcium oxalate is like a bunch of tiny thousand arrow traps dabbed with toxin. Water serves as trigger. Piercing effect hurts. Added toxins magnifies pain several times.

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.

How to Prevent Onion Tears?

Mother asked me to prepare meat and vegetables for cooking.  I washed meat and sliced it in cubes. Wash vegetables and chop it. Peeled few pieces of garlic and chopped it very finely.

The last part was really hard for me. It was the peeling and slicing of onions.  My eyes got irritated and tears began falling. The feeling was really uncomfortable. I need to wipe my teary red eyes very open. I used to wear sunglasses to protect my eyes from onions fumes.  I thought that was a good idea like wearing a helmet when you’re driving a motorcycle.  But my tears keep on falling even if I have shades to protect my precious eyes. Hmmm!

Onions produce the chemical irritant known as syn-propanethial-S-oxide. It stimulates the eyes’ lachrymal glands so they release tears. The process goes as follows:

  1. Lachrymatory-factor synthase is released into the air when we cut an onion.
  2. The synthase enzyme converts the sulfoxides (amino acids) of the onion into sulfenic acid.
  3. The unstable sulfenic acid rearranges itself into syn-ropanethial-S-oxide.
  4. Syn-propanethial-S-oxide gets into the air and comes in contact with our eyes. The lachrymal glands become irritated and produces the tears!

There are ways to prevent crying when dealing with onions.

  1. cut the root off last;
  2. refrigerate before cutting;
  3. peel them under cold water;
  4. have a fan behind you or alongside to blow the vapors away;
  5. place a piece of bread on the knife tip to absorb the fumes;
  6. chew gum while peeling and slicing onions.
  7. hold you breath and cut them as quick as you can
  8. have someone else cut them for you! But be ready to get some words of anger !

sliced-onions

Marvin is the lead chocolate maker of Ben and Lyn Chocolate Inc. Has strong background in food research and development. Occasionally conducts training and lectures. Lecturer of Cocoa Foundation of the Philippines. Do coaching and consultancy services on his free time.